Fifth Republican Senator Comes Out Against Senate Health Care Bill

Posted June 25, 2017

He pulled out the Senate Republican bill.

The draft bill was unveiled on Thursday by Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell as the upper chamber's response to the American Health Care Act, the Obamacare repeal legislation passed by the House in May.

Dean Heller on Friday became the latest Senate Republican to say he opposes the current GOP health care bill.

"Policies contained in the discussion draft will repeal the individual mandate so Americans are no longer forced to buy insurance they don't need or can't afford", McConnell said.

In his remarks, Trump said that the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, has been "wreaking havoc" on the nation's healthcare system, and that "millions more" would be hurt by its "deepening death spiral".

As a military veteran who uses the VA, and as someone who now works in the health care field, I believe a single-payer Medicare-for-all system is the only one that will truly work. That's the part that would get the ax under the Republican plan. It would deny coverage to many people with pre-existing conditions. The Senate Bill, did allow states to redefine what qualifies as an "essential" element of a healthcare plan. It would also let states get waivers to ignore some coverage standards that "Obamacare" requires of insurers. If it fails to reduce the deficit sufficiently or results in too many people losing insurance coverage, McConnell could fail to secure the 50 GOP votes he needs to secure passage. Under the Senate bill, tax credits would be based primarily on age as well as income and geography.

In a lengthy Facebook post, Obama said there is a "fundamental meanness at the core" of both the Senate's and House's health care legislation. The legislation would phase out federal funding for Medicaid expansion - now covering about 11 million people in 31 states - beginning in 2020, and shift more of those costs back to states.

Menendez gave his remarks at the Newark Community Health Center, a federally-funded health clinic where over 60 percent of patients rely on Medicaid to fund treatment. She said there's still a need for some sort of rule created to push healthy people to buy insurance, to replace Obamacare's individual mandate -which would be eliminated under the Senate proposal. Republicans also want to change the way the federal government calculates payments to the states starting in 2025, reducing the federal government's contribution to the states.

Trump later criticized the House bill privately as "mean" and this week called for a health plan "with heart".

It would phase out Obamacare's expansion of the Medicaid program for the poor and disabled over three years, from 2021 to 2024, and then enact deeper cuts in the program than the House version, beginning in 2025.

"I can not support a piece of legislation that takes insurance away from tens of millions of Americans and hundreds of thousands of Nevadans", said Heller.

Senate leaders are aiming for a vote before July 4.